Tag Archives: NAV 2013

Web Services Black Belt: consuming NAV web services using pure C/AL

MP900406779[1]Have you ever needed to connect to the Web services of one NAV instance from another one? If so, I bet that the approach was something like this: you created a .NET class where you defined a Web or Service reference to the target instance, and then you consumed that .NET class using .NET Framework interoperability. It was kind of clumsy, inflexible, but it worked.

How cool would it be if you could do something like this:

WITH WebService DO BEGIN
  CONNECT(‘http://localhost:7047/DynamicsNAV70/WS/CRONUS%20International%20Ltd/Page/Customer’);

  INIT;
  SETVALUE(‘Name’,’Test Customer’);
  SETVALUE(‘Blocked’,Cust.Blocked::Ship);
  SETVALUE(‘Credit_Limit_LCY’,10000);
  CREATE;

  MESSAGE(‘I just created Customer No. %1 in another NAV instance.’,GETVALUE(‘No’));
END;

Continue reading Web Services Black Belt: consuming NAV web services using pure C/AL

Benchmarking Results: NAV 2013 Outperforms All Previous Versions

imageMarketing is nice as long as it matches the reality. With Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013, Microsoft has promised a lot of improvements, but how well does NAV 2013 stand the reality test?

Apparently, outstandingly well.

Over the past two days, I have intensively tested NAV 2009 and NAV 2013 through a series of five different tests that measure different aspects of NAV data handling. My conclusion is clear: NAV 2013 is faster than any NAV you have ever seen, including the Classic client on the native database.

Continue reading to find out more about my findings and testing approach.

Continue reading Benchmarking Results: NAV 2013 Outperforms All Previous Versions

Top 5 SQL Server Improvements in NAV 2013

imagePerformance is one of those things you can’t get enough of and NAV is one of those systems where an extra operation per second is always welcome. Yesterday, during the Expert Panel at the NAV day of the Decisions Spring conference, there was a question: is there any improvement in how NAV 2013 works on SQL Server.

And the answer is: oh yeah!

As a matter of fact, everything is new and improved.

Jörg has already posted an overview of the news of NAV on SQL Server in his last blog post, but I still think there’s room for a couple of more words on the really amazing palette of news and improvements.

Continue reading Top 5 SQL Server Improvements in NAV 2013

NAV Expert Panel Session Begins

imageI’m right now sitting in the virtual lobby of the NAV Expert Panel Session of the NAV day of the Decisions Spring 2012 conference. The panel features three MVPs, three book authors, and established members of the NAV community: Eric Wauters, Matt Traxinger, Steven Renders, Brent Fisher and myself.

With Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 beta out and a lot of partners having laid their hands on it, I assume the discussion will develop around NAV 2013 topics.

I don’t know how much time I’ll have during the session, because I’ll probably be busy answering questions, but I’ll be tweeting live from the session, so if you don’t have an opportunity to join the conference, you can still stay in the loop by following me at @vjekob, or follow the conference hashtag #msdwdecisions.

Unlimited Text Length in NAV 2013

imageHave you noticed already that in Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2013 the text variables can have unlimited length? That’s quite a leap ahead of the previous versions which couldn’t handle more than 1024 characters per variable. If you wanted to achieve bug-free code then, when you were assigning texts around, you had to concatenate the result down to the MAXSTRLEN of the target text.

Not anymore.

The trick is to simply not declare the Length property on text variables. If you declare a variable of type Text, and then leave the Length empty, it means – unlimited.

Don’t worry – you won’t kill NAV by eating up all the available memory. Underneath C/AL there is .NET now, and strings in .NET are of unlimited length, or better yet – unlimittable – length anyway. Strings will only make things slow if you stuff the revised version of King James’s Bible in them. In all practical situations, there will be absolutely no performance penalty of leaving Texts unlimited.

I don’t know about you, but from tomorrow morning, I won’t be setting Length to my Texts.