Extending the HTML trick: using actual images

Eric Sevareid famously said that the chief cause of problems is solutions. The same applies to the HTML trick I blogged about yesterday. As soon as you solve the problem of using HTML directly in your control add-ins, another problem arises: what do you do with actual images your control add-in includes?

This post explains how to solve that problem, and how to make it possible for your control add-in to both use HTML for defining UI and use relative control add-in paths to images.

Let’s dig in.

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NAV TechDays 2018 Demos: Customer Star Rating

I usually post my NAV TechDays demo stuff for you to use and abuse, and this year won’t be an exception. There are three changes, to previous years, specially the last year. First, you won’t need to wait until New Year’s Eve for me to post my stuff. Second, I’ll blog each of the demos individually, because of the third reason. Third, I don’t want to merely dump my code here with a big fat disclaimer; no – I’ll dump it with a big fat disclaimer and some explanations about what the code does and why.

So, here we go, the first demo (actually the second, because I already posted that Muppet Theme): Customer Star Rating control add-in.

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Encapsulation in JavaScript

This will be my last post in the “JavaScript for (C/)AL Developers” series today. If I continued blogging about nearly pure JavaScript stuff, you could reasonably ask if this is in fact an NAV blog or a JavaScript one. It’s still NAV, and while the stuff I am about to write about is purely a JavaScript concept, I find it highly relevant for any control add-in developer. So, hold my beer, and bear with me for another one.

One of the complaints I often hear about JavaScript is that in JavaScript there is no encapsulation. This is almost completely true, except for the fact that it’s entirely false.

Where is the problem in the first place, and then what is the solution? Let’s dive in.

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Some more thoughts about trampling over $

I am on a spree today. The number of topics I wanted to blog about has accumulated, and I just decided to dump the stuff over here while I both feel the motivation and have time for blogging. However, in this hurry, I forgot to add some important content to my previous post.

First, I forgot to mention that the example of my preserve-jquery script trick can be found in this github repo:

https://github.com/vjekob/controladdin-html

That’s the demo I blogged about earlier today, except this time it has two more branches:

  • Branch “problem”: showcases how a problematic script can break your code.
  • Branch “solution”: showcases how this problem can be fixed by applying the trick from my previous post

Also, there are two JSFiddles I created to follow screenshot-base examples from the post:

I have one more topic to cover today, which has much more to do with JavaScript than control add-ins, but I still find it very relevant. Stay tuned.

Preventing trampling over $

In my previous post, I’ve written about the situation when you (or somebody you trust) redeclares the $ variable, thus inadvertently breaking all your jQuery code. I’ve also explained how to remedy for it inside the code you write by applying the Immediately Invoked Function Expression (IIFE) or Self-Executing Anonymous Function pattern.

However, is there anything you can do to prevent anyone from trampling over $ or jQuery variables in the first place?

As I said in my last post, yes, and no.

Let’s take a closer look at it.

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