Last month in NAV blogs

Spring has come. You can tell it. Okay, to be totally honest, nature and weather, at least over here at my place, haven’t done their part (yet), but NAV blogs have for sure made up for that. A lot of dormant blogs have awaken, some have erupted, and there were a lot of good stuff to read from my fellow NAV bloggers in March 2009.

As always, there is no particular order to this NAV blogosphere review, and I’ll just randomly report about what I found interesting.

Plataan is alive and kicking again, and has published three nice tips and tricks posts. If you had issues with reporting services reports and regional settings, want to make NAV 2009 notes functionality work in Classic client, or want to send links to RoleTailored client pages by e-mail, you should check out their blog.

Microsoft Dynamics CEE Blog has reported about MicroSource portal, a project from a Czech company, with a simple mission: “optimize effectively the use of partner resources”. If a partner company has available resources but no work, they can share them through this portal with those partner that has work but no resources. In the times of economic downturn, this initiative can keep work balanced, partners in business, and customers happy. Kudos to the idea, and good luck!

NAV Reporting blog has broken an almost two months long silence with couple of useful posts about reporting through RDLC in NAV 2009, one about creating dashboards in NAV 2009 and another showcasing four more demo reports. The greatest thing is that the blog doesn’t just show off some nice functionality, but also makes all these reports available for download.

Waldo has been particularly active in March. He started with an update to his fantastic Platform updates overview – 3.70B – NAV2009 RTM resource list. It includes all the info you need about changes and development in NAV since version 3.70B. The list is nicely structured and organized, provides hyperlinks to (almost ;-)) all useful resources you need (it doesn’t link to my blog, but I’ll forgive Waldo, he reviewed my book so I’ll let him get away with this :-)) and I highly recommend you to go and check it out, it might help you more than once.

If you didn’t have a chance to attend Convergence New Orleans, you can get a gist of what it was like by reading Waldo’s Convergence Diary series of blog posts. Start here, with the introduction post, but be prepared to spend quite some time, because his series of seven posts will catch your attention and keep it. It make me long for the deceased Convergence EMEA, and I hope it was cancelled only temporarily.

If like geography, you’ll definitely want to visit Freddys Blog, where Freddy published a series of blog posts about mapping and Virtual Earth integration in Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009. There is a lot of code and walkthrough there, so be prepared for a lot of copy/paste. Integration with mapping software is not just a eye-candy feature to make the audience drool and ooh and aah at presentations; there are tons of scenarios and practical situations when having features such as these comes handy. Go, and check it out, I highly recommend it.

One of the comeback blogs in March is Alex Chow’s Confessions of a Microsoft Dynamics NAV Consultant. Alex has posted an interesting (and very useful!) post about how to correctly set up Microsoft Dynamics NAV Account Schedules feature to calculate COGS. Even if you are not interesting in this particular feature, it might pay off to check it out, if for nothing, then for a quick costing refresher.

I’ll conclude last month’s blogs review with redelivering a complete blog post from Plataan, where Vincent Bellefroid explained through a short joke why training is so important:

A CEO was debating a training initiative for his company, someone asked him:

"What if you train everyone and they all leave?"

He responded:

What if we don’t train them and they all stay?

Have a nice April!

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